Word Limit For Personal Statement Postgraduate Sample

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Writing a Personal Statement for Postgraduate Study Applications

 

Personal statements are frequently required in applications for postgraduate study, in particular business courses, such as MBAs, but are also required for areas such as postgraduate teacher training. You are typically allowed about 1 page of A4 (250-500 words) to "sell yourself". Sometimes you will simply be asked to "provide evidence in support of your application" whereas sometimes the question will be much more prescriptive:

"Describe briefly your reasons for wanting to teach giving the relevance of your previous education and experience, including teaching, visits to schools and work with other young people"
PGCE (teacher training) application form.

Sometimes (as in the example given above), you will be given a very clear indication of what you should write, but in the absence of this, here are some guidelines. Don't use the same statement for all applications. Each statement will need a slightly different emphasis, depending on the university you are applying to. Make sure that you answer the questions asked in each statement. Research the university and course/research area. Find out what sets your choice apart from other universities.

Use good English. If your statement is fresh, lively, and different, you'll be putting yourself ahead of the crowd. Read your statement very carefully. Do your draft on a word-processor and spell and grammar check it, but also give it to a friend to read. Be clear and concise. Don't woffle! Show the ability to put the salient points across in a few words. Stay within prescribed word limits. Pay attention to presentation - type the statement if your handwriting is at all poor. Be positive and enthusiastic – selectors will read many personal statements and you want yours to stand out.

Give your statement a structure with an introduction, a main body and an end. The opening paragraph is important as it is here that you grab the reader's attention or lose it. This paragraph becomes the framework for the rest of the statement. The middle section might detail your interest and experience in your particular field, as well as your knowledge of the field. Be as specific as you can in relating what you know about the field and use the language professionals use in conveying this information.

Get your final draft checked by friends or the duty careers adviser. A careers adviser is on duty to help with queries between 10.30 am to 12.30 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. every weekday in the Careers Service. You don't need to book an appointment to see the duty careers adviser - just ask at reception to see them.

Possible content for your statement

  • Why do you want to do the course/research?
    Try to convey your enthusiasm and motivation for study/research. Don't try to write what you think they want to hear, write your real reasons. Write about any projects dissertations or extended essays you have done if they are relevant or demonstrate relevant skills. Mention any prizes you have won, also travel or study abroad and relevant employment. Describe anything that shows creativity, dependability or independence.
  • Why this subject?
    Be clear about why you have chosen this. Is the programme noted for a particular emphasis, speciality or orientation? When did you become interested in this field and what have you learned about it? What insights have you gained? How have you learned about this field - through classes, seminars, work or conversations with academic staff?
  • Why this university?
    Are there specific academic staff you want to do research or study with?
  • What academic skills have you got to offer?
    Computing skills, knowledge of relevant scientific techniques etc. If your A levels were poor (or you didn't do these, try to show an upward progression during your time at University).
  • What personal skills can you offer? e.g. ability to work in a team, with little supervision.
    Demonstrate that you've done your homework about the course/research and that you've seriously considered your strengths and weaknesses for postgraduate study or research. If you have done vacation jobs, what skills have you learned e.g. teamworking, communication, working under pressure. Have you had to overcome any obstacles or hardships in your life? This may show evidence of determination/resilience.
  • What are your strengths?
    In what ways are you better than other applicants. If you can't answer this question, don't expect the selectors to answer it for you!
  • What is the relevance of your first degree to this study?
    Point out any circumstances that may have effected your academic results, that you think should be considerered by the selectors.
  • What are your career aims?
    You may not have a very clear focus on what you want to do afterwards, but you should have some ideas. A clear direction will strengthen your commitment to do well in your studies and selectors will know this. Your desire to become a lawyer, lecturer, or whatever should be logical, the result of specific experience in your statement.

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The personal statement is arguably the trickiest part of the postgraduate application process, and it's essential that you get it right

This is your first real chance to sell yourself to the university. It should be unique to you and tailored to the course that you're applying to. You should use it to show off your skills, academic ability and enthusiasm, and demonstrate that the programme will benefit from your attendance as much as you'll benefit from studying it.

How long should my personal statement be?

Usually, it should be one side of A4, equating to around 300-500 words. Some universities require more though, so check the guidelines.

What should I include?

You should discuss your:

  • reasons for applying and why you deserve a place above other candidates - discuss your academic interests, career goals and the university and department’s reputation, and write about which aspects of the course you find most appealing, such as modules or work experience opportunities. Show that you're ready for the demands of postgraduate life by demonstrating your passion, knowledge and experience.
  • your goals - consider your short-term course aims and long-term career ambitions, relating the two.
  • your preparation - address how undergraduate study has prepared you, mentioning your independent work (e.g. dissertation) and topic interests.
  • your skillset - you should highlight relevant skills and knowledge that will enable you to make an impact, summarising your abilities in core areas including IT, numeracy, organisation, communication, time management and critical thinking. You can also cover any grades, awards, placements, extra readings or conferences that you've attended

How do I write a good personal statement?

Give yourself plenty of time to complete your personal statement. Tutors will be able to tell if you're bluffing, and showing yourself up as uninformed could be costly. Before you start, read the rules and guidelines provided, check the selection criteria and research the course and institution.

You should structure your personal statement so that it has a clear introduction, main body and conclusion. Capture the reader's attention with enthusiasm and personality at the outset, before going into more detail about your skills, knowledge and experience. Around half of the main body should focus on you and your interests, and the other half on the course. Finally, summarise why you're the ideal candidate.

Be sure to address any clear weaknesses, such as lower-than-expected module performance or gaps in your education history. The university will want to know about these things, so explain them with a positive spin. Lower-than-expected results may be caused by illness, for example. Admit this, but mention that you've done extra reading to catch up and want to improve in this area.

Continue drafting and redrafting your statement until you're happy, then ask a friend, family member or careers adviser to read it. Your spelling and grammar must be perfect, as the personal statement acts as a test of your written communication ability. Memorise what you've written before any interviews.

What do admissions tutors look for?

Admissions tutors will be looking for:

  • an explanation of how the course links your past and future;
  • an insight into your academic and non-academic abilities, and how they'll fit with the course;
  • evidence of your skills, commitment and enthusiasm;
  • knowledge of the institution's area of expertise;
  • reasons why you want to study at the institution;
  • you to express your interest in the subject, perhaps including some academic references or readings.

What do I need to avoid?

You shouldn't:

  • be negative
  • follow an online template
  • include irrelevant course modules, personal facts or extracurricular activities
  • include other people's quotes
  • lie or exaggerate
  • make pleading statements
  • namedrop key authors without explanation
  • needlessly flatter the organisation that you're applying to
  • repeat information found in your application
  • use clichés, gimmicks, humour or Americanisms
  • use overly long sentences
  • use the same statement for each application
  • use your undergraduate UCAS application as a template
  • waffle.

Example personal statements

The style and content of your personal statement will depend on several variables, such as the type of qualification that you're applying for - such as a Masters degree, the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or teacher training. Here are four examples to help you get started:

LPC personal statement

Although CABs, the centralised applications system, allows space for up to 10,000 characters in length, many law schools aren't expecting students to fill this space. It's therefore important not to unnecessarily pad out your personal statement with irrelevant detail. Students apply to three courses ranked in order of preference, so your personal statement must reflect this. Discover more about the Legal Practice Course.

Psychology personal statement

Applications for conversion courses such as these are fairly straightforward and made directly to individual institutions. You need to explain why you want to change subjects and how your current subject will help you. Explain what experience you have that will help you with your conversion subject, and what you hope to do in the future.

Personal statement for PGCE primary

This is your chance to explain why you want to teach primary age children and convey your enthusiasm for teaching. You need to back everything up with examples from your classroom experience, reflecting on what you did, how this made a difference and what you learned about teaching and learning within Key Stages 1 and 2. Find out more about applying for teacher training.

PGCE secondary personal statement

If you want to teach children aged 11 and over you'll need to apply through UCAS Teacher Training (UTT). The UTT teacher training application process includes a single personal statement, whatever route(s) you're applying for. You should tailor your personal statement to reflect the specific requirements of secondary level teaching. Learn more about applying for teacher training.

Find out more

Written by Editor

Prospects · June 2016

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