The Berlin Blockade Essay Definition

Essay on The Failure of The Berlin Blockade

2179 Words9 Pages

The Berlin Blockade
What were the main factors that ultimately led to the failure of the Berlin Blockade?

Word Count: 1957

TABLE OF CONTENTS
A. Plan of the investigation ……………………………………………………………………….. 3
B. Summary of Evidence …………………………………………………………………………. 4
C. Evaluation of Sources .…...…………………………………………………………………….. 6
D. Analysis ………………………………………………………………………………………... 8
E. Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………………… 10
F. List of Sources ………………………………………………………………………………….. 11

A. PLAN OF THE INVESTIGATION
The aim of this investigation is to assess the main factors that ultimately led to the failure of the Berlin blockade, giving the Soviets…show more content…

Whereas Soviet Policy toward East Germany Reconsidered: The Postwar Decade by Ann L. Philips is used because it gives a post revisionist view on the crisis.

B. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE
The Berlin blockade was created as a result of “violation by the Governments of the United States of America, Great Britain, and France of agreed decision taken by the powers in regard to Germany and Berlin.” This violation was “the carrying out of a separate currency reform, in the introduction of a special currency of Berlin and in the policy of dismemberment in Germany,” which included the “designation of a separate Government for the western zones.” Russian Chief representative, Marshall Sokolovsky walked out of the Allied Control Council meeting and failed to schedule another meeting the next month. “On June 23 the Russians introduced their own currency for Berlin,” the East Mark to counter the Western currency, the West Mark which was introduced the next day. The new West Mark was given the same value as the East Mark, “leaving the door open for negotiations.”
“On June 24 the Soviets responded to the implementation of the new currency arrangement in the western zones by halting all western land traffic into the city.” The United States placed a counter blockade on the goods from the Western Zones into Eastern Germany which would effect the Soviet economy. The government of the United States was prepared to

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The Berlin Wall Essay

792 Words4 Pages

The Berlin Crisis reached its height in the fall of 1961. Between August and October of that year, the world watched as the United States and the Soviet Union faced off across a new Cold War barrier, the Berlin Wall. In some ways, the Wall was Khrushchev’s response to Kennedy’s conventional buildup at the end of July, and there were some in the West who saw it that way. However, as Hope Harrison has clearly shown, Khrushchev was not the dominant actor in the decision to raise the Wall, but rather acquiesced to pressure from East German leader Walter Ulbricht, who regarded the Wall as the first step to resolving East Germany’s political and economic difficulties. The most pressing of these difficulties was the refugee problem, which was at…show more content…

Instead, they saw the Wall as an admission by Khrushchev that his pressure on Berlin was not working in the face of their steadfast policy. This sense did not mean that Western officials felt it possible to relax on Berlin, or that they believed that they had won the issue and the crisis would now pass. While there was a sense of relief across Western governments, there was also a sense of renewed crisis, accompanied by fears that acceptance of the Wall would undermine not only West Berliner confidence, but also West German confidence. Some circles also saw the Wall as a challenge to the Western position in Europe, and looked for ways to tear it down. Others recognized this desire, and feared that an assault against the Wall might be the spark that ignited the war the West was trying so hard to avoid.
Although neither side pushed a confrontation over the new Wall dividing East and West Berlin, the action of building it naturally caused tensions, both official and unofficial, and confrontations were almost inevitable. For the most part, these confrontations remained low-level, consisting of disputes over access procedures that had to be modified to meet the new physical realities. By October, though, the pressure of these confrontations built up to one of the most climactic events of the Cold War, the standoff between American and Soviet tanks across the dividing line at the Checkpoint Charlie crossing

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